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The BYOD dilemma

philoffer

Bring your own device (or BYOD) policies are continuing to gain strength in corporate Australia due to the explosion in more user-friendly, fashionable smartphones but companies are putting greater control around the policy to limit their support costs.

 

So when considering whether to implement a BYOD policy, an organisation should ensure that the timing is right and that the costs and risks are acceptable. Have you started on your own BYOD policy journey? What have been some of the top considerations when building your BYOD policy?

Re: The BYOD dilemma

LizzieB
Dear philoffer, Firstly, a resounding thank you is in order for bringing the BYOD concept to my attention. Despite working currently for the Victorian Government, and in the past, QLD Gov and Federal government departments, I had not previously head of this new organizational trend. After reading your post, I promptly began to research the BYOD movement. In all the articles, sample policies and arguments for and against BYOD, I was still left with two burning questions...would not a BYOD policy blur the already hazy lines between work and home, and would not the use of personal devices for work purposes only service to tip the work / life balance into the formers favour? What I found, or rather did not find, is any consideration for the employees wellbeing in the movement towards BYOD policies. If I may, allow me to posit that utilizing a personal device in both the work and life space, will only serve to strengthen our growing attachment to technology, and thus increase our growing detachment from each other. Please don't misinterpret my words as those of a neo-luddite...indeed I am 'penning' this reply on an iPad 2 from a bluetooth keyboard. What I would like to do is start a conversation about the BYOD trend that focuses more on ensuring employee wellbeing is a focal point, instead of just an afterthought brought on by an increase in unplanned days off, WorkCover claims and presenteeism in our workplaces. With kind regards, Lizz

Re: The BYOD dilemma

MiCCAS
To be honest with you, when a company is struggling to keep up with BYOD I have to wonder if they're looking at why there's such a demand. Is it because the tools they're supplying to their staff aren't appropriate?

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Re: The BYOD dilemma

PhilipGParker

Hi Lizz

I think the increasing use of mobility whether that be through BYOD or company supplied phones does raise the valid concern of work life balance. Mobile working has the potential to deliver a number pf productivity benefits however it isn't necessarily about getting staff to work longer hours but about providing them with the tools for ' flexible working' so that employees can perform their jobs in the location and times that maximise their productivity. Ideally with the right procesess and governance agreed up front it should be something that benefits both the company and the employee.

 

Regards

Philip Parker

By Philip Parker, Optus Business Director of Product Marketing (Mobility). More from Philip on Twitter: @pguestp
All views expressed are the author’s own.

Re: The BYOD dilemma

PhilipGParker

Hi,

The rapid proliferation of smartphones coupled with the pace of introduction of new smartphones and tablets and the associated operating systems is providing organisations with the challenge of keeping up with the 'latest and greatest' devices for their staff to use. The push to bring personal devices into the workplace is very much being driven by employees wanting to be able to use the devices they like - in most cases these are smartphones and increasingly tablets.

 

The challenge for orgainsations and this to some extent addresses your question as to whether they are providing the tools that are apporporiate for their staff is how to mange this in a way that addresses their particular governance and security needs especially around sensitive data in the case of the later.

 

Regards

Philip Parker

By Philip Parker, Optus Business Director of Product Marketing (Mobility). More from Philip on Twitter: @pguestp
All views expressed are the author’s own.

Re: The BYOD dilemma

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kosuvaalai

This is an useful information and I refer this from Google.com .

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