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New Contributor 1Ryan
New Contributor

Moving to NBN

We are current customers of Optus and have just been advised that NBN is now ready in our area and we need to switch over

 

We are currently on a Home Phone + Cable Broadband Package unlimted data  + international calls to some countries  + Free Local national Call to landline and mobiles @ approx $92 per month

 

I am now being told by the optus rep I spoke to this morning that I can move to the same NBN package that I currently am - but  need to pay $9 more per month and my speed is capped at 25 MPBS - currently I am getting much better speeds

 

 I dont this is fair|!!! - Does anyone else have the same issue?

 

 If anyone has switched over any idea what your peak and off peak speeds are and will my current cable will be upgraded.

 

I asked the rep to send me some information and all he did was emailed some information that I could have got from the optus website

 

I dont mind moving to a VOIP phone so appreciate if anyone out there has gone through to please post 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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22 Replies
Honoured Contributor
Honoured Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

Hi Ryan,

 

TBH, to date the arrangement has been "unfair" - we're finally seeing that corrected. 

 

One of the biggest reasons for the NBN rollout is to spread high speed internet across the entire country. It was also to improve the base speed many inner city households could get beyond the (only) 5Mbps ADSL option. You sound like one of the (previously) lucky ones, but upgrading the network is of course costly and everyone is going to have to pay more. Of course many households will experience significant performance boosts for the same (or less) expenditure, but you (and I) will have to pay a bit more for similar performance in the short term. If it helps any, the Optus cable you've been using is almost at end of life (it will be completely dismantelled for junk in 2-3 years)

 

On your switch over, all Telcos provide an 18 month window to customers to transition to the NBN. All Telcos except it appears Optus that is. They have in many cases set a deadline of a couple of months (after NBNCo goes live). Enthusiastic reps have been known to try pressure sales, telling you you have to move NOW. Telling you its the NBNs fault, telling you you need to get a new 24 month contract,etc. 

 

If optus do go down this route in your area then you have many options. If you don't sign up a new (NBN) contract then they will just cancel any remaining service on their deadline (2-3 months out). This means your contract ends with no penalties etc. 

 

One of the other massive benefits of the NBN is that instead of Optus being the only ones to supply Optus cable, now just about every ISP can use NBNCo wires to provide you a service. So feel free to shop around and maybe pick a better deal if you can find one.

 

On future speeds, its meant to be what you signed up for (so if you are on a 50Mbps plan then 45+ it should be most of the time) That doesn't seem to be the case in all households. Many are seeing speeds drop in peak hours (7pm-10pm) and others find there speeds are just never close to the amount they are paying for. This can and is being slowly worked out - NBN is deploying 30,000 connects a week at the moment. Pricing and ISPs etc is also being worked through. We are also running two whole internets at the same time at the moment so as the NBN completes in 2021 that should clear up a lot.

 

But the simpler answer is you won't really know until you get connected. It also depends on what tech is in your area (are you going to NBN Cable? FTTN? 

 

On plans, well Optus really only has one. The $60 cheapy is not worth it unless you never use the internet IMO. So you need the $80 one and if you want to keep a land line its another $20. Deciding to cut the landline and go the mobiles only saves you some good $$$? You will be on the standard Boost speed (25 Mbps download). Jump that up to 100Mbps for another $20 if you need it. (Which brings me to another benefit you will be getting for your money - upload speeds. Even on cable is limitted now to 2Mbps. This jumps to 5Mbps on boost and 40Mbps on boost plus)

 

So, long story short - Don't sign with optus till you're ready (get a month to month option if you can so you can test out speeds first). Look around and see if you can find other options.

 

Regards

 

Peter Gillespie

Frequent Contributor
Frequent Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

We were in pretty much the same position. Wife got a call saying we had to move across NOW or be disconnected. I "spoke" to someone on the live chat who didn't listen. Simply kept giving the same speel about having to move within 90 days of the area being ready. I also queried the price and speed. I average 30mbps +/- 3mbps. I am on cable not ADSL. So I queried the speed issue and especially the "up to" when they talk about 25mbps. So, it turns out there is no guarantee of any speed at all except that it will be capped at 25mbps in the unlikely event you ever get that high. This is why there are reports of people getting not much faster than dial up speeds. But, she told me, I could get the "speed pack" for an additional $20 per month. That will give me "up to" 50mbps. OK, I said, so if I get the speed pack I will get somewhere between 25mbps and 50mbps but you cannot guarantee how close to the 50 I will get. No, no she said; "up to" means anywhere form zero to 50mbps. So let me clarify I said. Even if I opt for the speed pack I might still get less than - even substantially less than - the 25mbps standard pack. "We cannot guarantee minimum speeds" she said. So what do I get for the extra $20 I asked. Basically it came down to the "possibility" of getting 50mbps (and that seems likely only in years when there are 30 days in February).

So I did some research. The ACCC states clearly and unambiguously on its website that once NBN is ready in an area users have 18 months to make the move. So this time I returned the call to the person who told my wife we had to move NOW and said I didn't want to. I quoted what the ACCC says about the 18 months and  that it is not legal for the Telco to cancel you service simply because you choose not to move over at their convenience.and she simply said "OK. Call us when you are ready". No further urgency. No pressure. No threat of shutdown. So clearly they are attempting strong arm / bluff tactics to have people move asap so they can shut down the existing system and save themselves a buck or two - at our inconvenience. I note the call was not from Optus direct but a contractor they are using.

I cannot see how they can offer a service with "up to" speeds and no guarantee. I cannot see how it is legal to charge extra for a "speed pack" with no guarantee anything will be delivered for the money charged. It's like con men selling stuff off the backs of covered wagoins in the wild west movies. Promises that do not deliver.

I did further research and quickly concluded Optus is not alone. ALL providers I tested - I stopped at 8 - were the same. Uncommitted waffle is all you get from them.

 As to the massive benefit of being able to shop around, that is stymied by Telcos doing exclusive deals with streaming providers. You want your favourite series you need to sign up with whoever has the streamer that carries that show. Optus has Fetch for example. Yes iiNet does too, but their standard plan is even worse..."up to" 12mbps, and their Fetch doesn't have the EPL.

Honoured Contributor
Honoured Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

A lot of info there @Khun_Tilt - its pretty daunting getting a handle on what's best to do with the Telcos and NBN all playing games. I should clarify a few things.

 

1. What NBN technology are you getting? Fibre? FTTN? Cable?

 

2. Optus may have backed off, but unfortunately you do still have only ~90 days to arrange what you're going to do. As you say Optus are eager to get on with the transition and shut down their network ASAP. So come 90 days you will suddenly recieve no signal. Optus will end your contract (Obviously no fees will apply). Yes the ACCC is annoyed Optus are doing this, but its apparently quite legal.

 

3. The "Up To" has been an industry/customer bug bear for over a decade. Didn't really apply to cable, but it was generally needed with ADSL because your top speed depended on where you lived and was unknown before plugging in. The NBN arriving has already changed that a fair bit. NBNCo is tasked with ensuring speeds from your house to the ISPs (the formally unknown bit of the network) to perform at the speeds said (12,25,50 or 100). So the Telcos can no longer say "Up To". Already most Telcos (including Optus) will cancel/change contracts without penalty if you're not getting appreciably the speeds you signed up for. Its not the best solution but its definitely motivation for them to advertise actual performance and meet that.

 

4. Depends on your connection but $20 should buy you 100Mbps as far as I can see. Optus don't offer 50Mbps options. You can start off with the default speeds (25Mbps) to see how that goes and add a boost pack any time (you can take it off anytime too)

 

4. FWIW You can also buy a Fetch outright at Harvey Norman for $400 (Currently you're leasing your box and possibly paying $20 a month for it - you will have to give the Fetch box back if you leave Optus. Yes the streaming options are different at different but I guess that's why they offer them (EPL rights cost Optus a small fortune and they likely make a loss on having them) - but if they keep you as a customer then its probably worth it. If you do switch providers you could possibly keep your mobile phones with Optus and set them up to stream your Optus shows? 

 

So you'll have to make a decision in the next month or two. As you say they're all a bit waffly about actual performance but the chances are you'll find the speeds are exactly what you expect (however there are a lot of annoyed people here). You'll need to decide if you stay with Optus (bit more $ but you keep the EPL / Fetch etc.) or if you go elsewhere (possibly cheaper and but need to re-organise your entertainment).

 

The main upside IMO is if the bandwidth is lousy then you should be able to ask to end the contract and move to another provider. The main downside is that I'm still not getting the sense that ANY provider is hitting the ball out of the park on bandwidth yet.

 

Regards

 

Peter Gillespie

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Frequent Contributor
Frequent Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

Wow @petergdownlad you are not a trusted contributor are you, but clearly, by your sycophantic attempots to defend Optus, are an employee masquerading as a contributor.

1. The Ombudsman has also advised me that Optus CANNOT legally turn me off just because I do not move to their timetable. At the 18 month deadline yes they can. Don't agee? Take it up with him...and the ACCC as I think their view has more weight than yours.

2. My wife and I run an accounting practice. We cannot have disruption, especially between now and the end of September which is peak tax time. I have advised Optus of this. If they shut us off we will sue (and I will seek support for a class action).

3. When they can guarantee a minimum level of service for the fee charged without interruptions I will gladly move.

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Honoured Contributor
Honoured Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

@Khun_Tilt And here I was thinking I'd get a thanks for providing some facts and alternative options. Smiley Surprised 

 

I suspect you have misunderstood what the person at the ACCC was saying (or they misunderstood what you were asking). Yes Optus can't force you on to another (NBN) contract (much that they might give that impression). They can, do and are regularly terminating existing contracts when they want. Your contract with them allows for them to give you (some) notice and discontinue the service. Personally I find the practice aggressive, but Optus obviously feel that the few customers they lose is worth it due to the savings from shutting down their network. In their defence, if 90% of their customers have already migrated to the NBN after three months then maintaining their entire cable network for another 15 months is hardly going to be profitable.

 

If you can't afford downtime with your internet then I suggest you do some double checking as in three months you will be cut off. You've had notice given and now have some time to choose a new ISP (Optus or Other). It should be a pretty straight forward process (much less involved than decimating your business and formulating a class action for compensation)

 

Regards

 

Peter Gillespie

 

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Frequent Contributor
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Re: Moving to NBN

@petergdownload   Let's just be clear...you are an Optus employee, right. If you are simply just a customer then your extreme efforts at defending the indefensible are extraordinary. So let's clear the air and confirm your status.

I wouldn't care about moving over IF they could guarantee there would be no lags in the crossover process - they cannot or will not - if they can guarantee no downtime (other than the usual unforeseen that we have now) - the cannot or will not, or that we will ever get anywhere near the speeds they advertise - they cannot or will not. It is an extraordinary attitude they - and all Telcos, Optus are not alone - are taking, and so trying to move to another really makes no difference.

Mark my words it will hit the fan and there will be class actions and a Royal Commission or Senate inquiry within 12-18 months. The industry stinks...forcing people to move to a product that has clear flaws and implementation issues. Trawl Yes Crowd and see the posts, and the speed test screen captures, of people only getting marginally better than dial up speeds since they moved over.

As to having notice given, I have not actually been given official notice. A very aggressive woman called my wife two weeks after the area become NBN enabled and insisted she enter a new contract that day - literally. My wife advised the account was in MY name and she would have to call back. I rang and complained to Optus and was advised noone from Optus had made contact. Turns out it was a contractor that Optus is engaging. Optus I must say were not too pleased with the aggressive stance. They listened to what I had to say and the reason why I cannot move at this time which are:

(1) one cannot simply take the risk of business being affected at the busiest time of the year for an accounting practice (tax time);

(2) the tax lodgement software will simply not allow a seemless transition in any case, even if there were no other transition issues. There is a lengthy validation and verification process conducted by the software vendors and the ATO which is why it is always done well ahead of tax season.

As a result I was told the end of October would be fine.

If they now  simply close me down and business suffers I WILL lodge official complaints and take whatever other action may be required; and perhaps it will stir up a class action as I know I will not be the only one peeved.

As I have said, I have no objection to moving to NBN but not at this time for the above reasons and because I would prefer to move to a system that has the wrinkles ironed out. That is not too much for customers to ask.

Finally, it is a bloody disgrace to charge more per month but deliver slower speeds than I currently have on my cable connection (30mbps +/-3mbps). It is outrageous to then offer a "speed" pack for an additional $20 a month and then say I may not even get up to the 25mbps. It is like charging for air conditioning in a car but saying you'll get it only if we have one delivered with it fitted otherwise you'll get what comes and no refund. Under ANY normal circumstances who would accept that type of scenario.

 

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Honoured Contributor
Honoured Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

 To be clear.

 

No, I'm not an Optus employee (just a fellow customer). But that's besides the point if you take what I've written at face value. What you do with the information I've provided is your business (litereally). I suggest you  re-read my posts. I struggle to find any extreme defence of Optus in them. Just trying to give you a heads up on what will happen and why.

 

Optus' aggressive approach to transitioning their customers to the NBN has been widely critisised, but to my knowledge its still doing it and its quite legal for it to do so. FWIW there's no negotiation on the shutoff time. You've asked for ~90 days grace which is within the Optus time frame anyway. You've also just chatted with customer service who have no control over the shut off. I suspect soon you'll get a letter detailing the shutoff (with another offer of course) and possibly one last contact before final termination. NB Termination isn't done on an individual basis - Optus just shuts down the whole suburb with their off switch.

 

On the wider NBN issues, you're not alone in your anger. Its a big change, and everyone wants change until it affects them. Then its a disgrace Smiley Indifferent Optus (and all Telcos) are in a bind because while you've been told you must move to the NBN so have the Telcos. The pricing and performance tiers are largely dictated by NBNCo (and behind them the government). Optus had a pretty sweet deal going with their almost exclusive cable tech but now they've been told everyone gets access to it and these are the new prices. 

 

So anyway, two things I know

 

1. You have around 90 days before you lose the internet.

2. You can resign with Optus or pick any other RSP.

 

The balls in your court Smiley Happy

 

Peter Gillespie

 

 

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

@petergdownload  OK. Have just spent 2 hours of my life on this issue. Optus are now claiming the move has to happen in 70 days from becoming NBN ready - so they have cut it by 20 days all of a sudden. The do confirm - in writing - that THEY will not disconnect a user; that this is done by NBN Co. Interestingly, I contacted NBN Co and they advise they will NOT disconnect anyone just because they have not moved to NBN.

So clearly Optus is trying to coerce people to move at their (Optus) convenience with less than accurate claims about disconnection. Fortunately I made sure I got it all in writing.

As I have stated I do not oppose moving (although I do oppose the reduced speeds I will get as a cable user) but I cannot change mid tax season. Apart from the possibility of something going wrong with the changeover from an NBN perspactive,  the ATO needs to certify new modems and equipment for their electronic lodgement system. Without this I cannot lodge tax returns. Period. For a tax practice that is fatal. I have tried to explain this to Optus but clearly they simply read off a sheet with no comprehension of what they are actually saying or what the customer is saying.

But at least I know I will not be disconnected.

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New Contributor 1Ryan
New Contributor

Re: Moving to NBN

Thanks all for this robust discussion on moving to NBN

 

As a result of this discussion, I have been able to understand the broad issues of moving to NBN - I guess I have been lucky that I have Cable Broadband

 

I have spoken to Optus today who have confirmed that since we are on the Optus network we will be disconected in 90 days if we dont move to NBN.

 

I have also spoken to Telstra who have confirmed that as soon as NBN is offered in your area - they cannot sell a Cable Braodband Package. 

 

So I guess I will need to make the move to NBN

 

 

Overall I am disaapointed with Optus and their hard sell tactics and am seriously considering moving over to Telstra

 

Cheers

 

Ryan Almeida

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