cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Ask a Question
Welcome to the new look Community! We're still upgrading and making some changes to the platform over the coming weeks! Stay tuned.
Highlighted
Contributor NotesTracker
Contributor

Actual real-world speeds delivered by Optus NBN HFC plans?

For FTTP a.k.a. FTTH and HFC (now that HFC is being rolled out, for example Endeavour Hills in Victoria) ... If you pay for higher speed plans, such as the 50 Mbps or 100 Mbps plans, what actual average speeds are delivered by these speeds compared with 12 or 25 Mbps plans?

In other words, does paying more actually "guarantee" in any way that you will experience the extra speed that you're paying for? Is this provided to the customer as part of the sign-up for Optus NBN plans? What steps does Optus take to monitor and ensure that each higher speed plan actually delivers a better outcome than the lower-speed plans?

NOTE:

I want an Optus representative to answer this, since Optus community customers are not in a position to do so!

Postscript:
I've been using Optus HFC since around the turn of the century or before, these days happily getting reliable and consistent off-peak download speeds averaging 80 to 100 Mbps. NBN's website indicates that our area will be getting their HFC some time in 2019.  I'm concerned that when the changeover to NBN's HFC eventuates they will not deliver speeds as good as within the Optus HFC network.

Tags (3)
0 Kudos
Reply
3 Replies
Trusted Contributor
Trusted Contributor

Re: Actual real-world speeds delivered by Optus NBN HFC plans?

NOTE:

I want an Optus representative to answer this, since Optus community customers are not in a position to do so!

 

I'd like to see if they commit to anything.

 

What steps does Optus take to monitor and ensure that each higher speed plan actually delivers a better outcome than the lower-speed plans?

 

They have graciously let the ACCC investigate them, after continual fraud complaints.

https://www.accc.gov.au/consumers/internet-phone/monitoring-broadband-performance

 

In other words, does paying more actually "guarantee" in any way that you will experience the extra speed that you're paying for?

 

They always say "up to". See if you can see anywhere they guarantee a minimum at peak times.

0 Kudos
Reply
Frequent Contributor
Frequent Contributor

Re: Actual real-world speeds delivered by Optus NBN HFC plans?

 

 

 

 

0 Kudos
Reply
Esteemed Contributor
Esteemed Contributor

Re: Actual real-world speeds delivered by Optus NBN HFC plans?

The NBN is designed to provide high speed broadband nationwide. Those of us on cable have had that for better part of a decade now (cheap and fast). Unfortunately that means for most cable customers the NBN offers less than what we already have , although it provides several improvements: 

 

- Possible Upload speeds go from 2Mbps to 40Mbps

- You get complete portablility (any ISP can offer you cable now, not just Telstra or Optus) 

- The Optus cable network was close to EOL (It will be junked in 2021) - This is a just in time upgrade.

 

On the downside, broadband is currently more expensive. What Optus used to be able to for $x on its own network now costs more. This is largely because the government wants to NBN to become profitable ASAP and has set a very rapid (unrealistic IMO) deadline for payback. What this means is that most Telcos have not adjusted there plans (i.e. put prices up). Instead they've continued to promise similar performance while cutting back on the 'performance' they purchance each month. Offering unlimitted plans has also meant they have no control over customer usage. The result has been congestion and slow downs in peak times. 

 

As for individual experience that seems to vary widely (you may get what you pay for). Optus don't explicetly guarantee speeds, but another benefit of the NBN has been they are now actually accountable for providing the speeds they sell us. This is because the link between households and the ISP is now guaranteed by NBNCo (Before it was a variable technology and no one could guarantee any speed - only up to)

 

Put these two together and what could have is dodgy peak hour speeds but you will be able to exit your contract without penalty if you request it (which is exactly the approach Optus are currently taking). On the bright side you may get speeds pretty close to what you are paying for (and speed packs are optional so you can move up or down speeds each month without any penalty)

 

Regards

 

Peter Gillespie

0 Kudos
Reply
Top Contributors