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Occasional Contributor
Occasional Contributor

Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

So. A few months ago I was conned into giving up my slow - but reliable - ADSL Inet connection for the disaster known as the NBN. With 20- 40 dropouts a day and the NBN folk not giving a toss I tried to go back to ADSL (I had looked at wireless broadband a couple of years ago but no network provided Public IP Adresses) but was told it is not possible.

 

My provider then asked if I wanted to go to Wireless Broadband as they now supplied Public IP Addresses. Fantastic - finally! And it was on the Optus network even better!! However, turns out they dont know what a ' Public IP Address' is and the product (200GB for $59) uses the Optus subnet.

 

So OPTUS. In an open question, using your own forum - and hopefully answered by someone involved in generating revenue and/or with understanding of the mobile broadband market - I ask; Why does Optus not provide residential broadband products using Public IP Addresses? There is a very ready market - with technical savvy folk needing Public IP Address connections - due to the NBN not performing.

 

I am stuck with the damned awful NBN as it now has a monopoly of Public IP Address broadband products. When are the mobile networks going to wake up to an untapped revenue earning opportunity?

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Respected Contributor
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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

Only a limited amount of ipv4 addresses available, they have auctions for blocks of them now, so handing them out isn't really an option.

 

Mobile broadband via optus business (smb)  offers public (static) ip addresses for $5 per month per service. Not available on wireless broadband not consumer plans.


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Honoured Contributor
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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

I think @Paddylee gave a good explanation. I didn't realise how pricy the addresses have become. Here another Telco explains they pay $400,000 for 16,000 static IP addresses (a supply that lasts about 6 months) with price continuing to increase. 

 

I do wonder though as IPv6 has been around for over a decade no why the Telcos can't seem to move to the almost limitless amount of IP addresses this would provide.

 

As a seperate issue, the mobile wireless technology that Optus uses apparently has only a single global IP address and can't technically accomodate Static Ips no matter how much you want to pay (otherwise I'd just suggest using a service like DYDNS to keep devices up to date with your current IP address). 

 

On your NBN I take it your are FTTN? 

 

Peter Gillespie

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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

Then why do all NBN plans have Public IP addresses?

Yes, IPv4 has a limited number of addresses - approximatley 3.7 Billion - which is why IPv6 has been rolled out and steadily will taken up over the next 30-40 years.

However, currently, IPv4 is still available and hence all NBN plans have public IP addresses.

As I have pointed out in the original post Optus (and the other providers) are missing a trick; there is a market for products that have fixed IP addresses (I'm not talking Static IP addresses - DDNS has solved that can of worms - as that is a different matter and usually only needed now by large Internet sites/servers etc).

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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

What's the difference between fixed and static IP addresses?
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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

This is a very interesting and highly complex topic which has no simple answer but if I may add a few comments as some elements of the post were not clear to me. From my readings - 

1. The IP Addressing scheme may not be the cause of NBN dropouts as some users are blissfully unaware of these faults - the lucky ones! NBN drop outs need technical resolution, generally are associated with line and equipment conditions, and from my understanding, not IP addressing assignments. 

2. The complexity is due to the number Domains and tranversals involved in a connection path that may or may be Dual Stacked IPv4/IPv6 from point of origin to destination and along the way. How that traffic is encapsulated and passed through these individual networks varies. Each Domain may have different operating rules for IPv4 and IPv6 addresses - Device Network Adapter, Private Home Network  Modem/Router, Carrier Network, NBN Network, the Public Internet (many many many Routers) and then Mobile Networks. 

3. The Enterprise and Home Networking segment worlds are not rushing towards IPv6 in any great hurry - uptake is at a very slow pace (15-20% global uptake?). In that space, everyone gets their own IPv6 address that is visible to the rest of the world - its Static and Public, your MAC address is coded into it - there is no anonymity for the user - NAT protection disappears. This may alarm some home users that currently have up to 20 devices hidden behind their modems's NAT function, placing more emphasis on Firewall functionality in the future. It may allow law enforcement agencies to have clearer visibility into inappropriate useage of the Internet. 

Enterprise customers have a greater task in terms of re-addressing their networks and the cost benefit ratio does not seem to be favourable for the majority at this stage, coexistence seems to be the norm - keep IPV4 in place and migrate to IPv6 for new additions or trials.

3. I understand that Mobile Networks have been using IPv6 recently as there are simply too many users and it is generally a one-to-one connection, so for them NAT was not an issue. Telstra's Gen 2 Dual WAN Modem also uses IPv6 for the 4GLTE Back-Up function. 

4. Static IP Addresses are usually implemented for people who wish to operate a web server have users all over the world access it. Most businesses use these and I had previously understood residential users could also subscribe to one by paying extra. Not aware of current offerings. 

5. The Carrier Grade NAT mentioned in the article also has some challenges as an interim step towards IPv6 Nirvana.  It allows carriers to mark further time and provide higher level control of IP Address assignment within their own networks and to interconnect to other core infrastructure domains, such as NBN in a higher level. I also understand that Optus currently use CGNAT for the WAN link in the 4G LTE Mobile Broadband service ** (Huawei B525).

Unlike traditional Dynamically assigned IPv4 addresses that are assigned to the modems WAN port which are 'semi reserved' to a customer then refreshed every 24 hours by carriers, these are dynamically assigned and controlled by carriers on a first come, first served basis and more importantly, given out on demand. When the IP address is not in use, it is given to another user. Theoretically, your WAN IP address can change many times during the day. 

** notes

Mobile Broadband ( Mobile Data SIM or Voice and Data SIM) is different to NBN Wireless Broadband (Point to Point Radio Network)

Most land line NBN connections on the home modem are programmed as IPoE or Dynamic IP Assignment without User ID and Password. May vary as some NBN RSPs may still use PPPoE with User ID and Password. The Dynamic WAN IP addresses are not publicly accessible unless someone knows the address and if unauthorised attempts were made to connect to it, the Firewall/s would reject the attempt. Customer programmed Dynamic DNS Servers and Applications excluded. 

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Respected Contributor
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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

You would be surprised to know that NBN wireless uses the exact same 4g technology as the other mobile networks (can be picked up on your 4g mobile in the network list)

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Re: Why do Optus not offer Public IP address products?

@Paddylee  - Thanks for the feedback, I didn't realise that and I am surprised the scanning feature in your mobile phone picks up the NBN Fixed Wireless frequency and displays it as same. I included the note to differentiate the two different services as the original post used the terms interchangeably.

I agree with you that they both use a 4G technology but I don't think they are identical. My understanding is that Mobile Phone and Mobile Broadband Carriers# in Australia use a different 4G technology (FDD LTE/ 2 Channels) and frequencies to the NBN Fixed Wireless (TDD-LTE/ 1 Channel) which operates at 2300, 3400 and possible future 3500 Mhz (5G). Optus also use the 2300Mhz for mobile, so maybe this is why it appears on your phone or given that phones are made for international markets, if your mobile is not with Optus , it may support both 4G techniques.

Edit: # - this may be inaccurate as it appears Optus use BC40 2300Mhz on their Mobile Broadband in a TDD mode. I may have mixed myself up with placing a Voice& Data SIM into a Huawei B525 for analog phone voice calling. The Data SIM doesn't support Voice VoLTE as the SIP function is disabled.

4G Mobile technology uses a broadcast technique, the signal radiates out to everyone in a cell zone which can cover longer distances due to lower frequencies or greater number of towers and end users can be very mobile. Fixed Wireless operates under shorter distances due to high frequency and is a Point to Point transmission that requires line of sight between the Cell Tower and home; the end point must be stationary. 

This a very good backgrounder if you are interested to have a read - https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-TD-LTE-and-FDD-LTE

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