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THague
New Contributor
New Contributor

Unauthorised transfer

Just wondering what risk to privacy Someone might have if a personal mobile number is given to another customer without permission. 

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petergdownload
Honoured Contributor
Honoured Contributor

Re: Unauthorised transfer

A random total stranger? Not much.What would you do if you found out someones phone number?

 

Peter Gillespie

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THague
New Contributor
New Contributor

Re: Unauthorised transfer

Hi peter. My take is If I was that random stranger and I was receiving someone else’s business and private calls, text. I could pretty easily piece together the identity of the previous owner or pose as them to get more. Given two factor auth was linked to that number, it wouldn’t be too difficult to get Access to most services of the previous owner.

 

Looking to hear others thoughts on the issue as well as I am not black hat. 

 

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Shauna
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RetiredModerator

Re: Unauthorised transfer

Hey @THague - I certainly see your concerns here. Has your number been provided to another customer by Optus? Can you provide me with a little more detail?


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petergdownload
Honoured Contributor
Honoured Contributor

Re: Unauthorised transfer

As a matter of probability its extremely unlikely. You have to multiply the chance of this occurring by the chance that the person who gets this wants and can do what you are worried about.

 

 

There are much easier and surer ways for people in the second category to make the first category happen. For example strong passwords and TFA is pretty useless in a face of most corporations (Optus included) happy to fully reset your account and password if you can tell them your name, DOB and address. 

 

The Telco industry routinely gets 'tricked' into setting up a new iphone plan and sending it out to a customer after those details have been provided. I use quotes because they've done extremely little to prevent the practice. Optus for example has no dedicated fraud line worried customers can contact (using LiveChat after hours gets you the suggestion to call back the next working day). A simple procedure of getting confirmation via existing contact channels (letter, sms, email) at the time of sale would catch most, but the first most people find out they've been hacked is an SMS to the old number that "your port has been successfully completed" 

 

So yes accidental stuff ups are annoying and can take you aback but in the scheme of things they're not much of an issue relatively IMO

 

Peter Gillespie

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10000000000GB
Trusted Contributor
Trusted Contributor

Re: Unauthorised transfer

The typical situation is a scammer who takes your number because they know your DOB and driver's license. They then run through your bank accounts and see if any are using your number as a token. Paypal, ebay, Amazon, your online email accounts. They send scam emails to your friends, sell your number to Africans. The sky is the limit, depending on how interlinked your phone number is.

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