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Connected to Distant Exchange

[ Edited ]
zzzoptus

The closest exchange to me is 500m away, however Optus have connected me to one 4.5km away. This is apparently because the closer exchane(s) don't have open ports. I've been on this connection for almost a year now and I find it really hard to believe that there hasn't been any ports open since I got connected.

 

If I want to get connected to a closer exchange, do I just have to keep hassling Optus about this or do they not do it after your line has been connected?

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

10000000000GB

NBN or the 200GB 4G plans

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

petergdownload

Presumably not the NBN yet. When do you get the NBN? 

 

 

FWIW homes generally don't have multiple exchange options. Telstra controls the copper network (until the NBN takes over) and they have connected all houses to an exchange of their choice. This should be a radius around the node but in practice geography and other factors mean you can be 500m away from your closest node but connected to one Five km away. So in order to connect you to a different node Optus would have to request Telstra run a special wire between your house and the other exchange. 

 

So as mentioned by @10000000000GB probably best options are either 4G modem (capped at 12Mbps), 4G phone plan (capped at 100Gb or so a month) or wait for the NBN.

 

Regards

 

Peter Gillespie

 

 

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

[ Edited ]
10000000000GB

I don't think Home Wireless Broadband (capped at 12) is a thing anymore. They are selling 200GB uncapped for $80, plus $5 for STAN and Netflix unmetered. If you dare sign up for 12 months, the Netflix etc is thrown in.

 

The plans stop being sold on 2/9, but the 200GB month to month plan is no committment, so you can quit next week, if you want.

 

There will also be some kind of discount pre-Christmas, so it's best to avoid 12 month plans.

 

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

petergdownload

@10000000000GB

 

So the plans stop being sold tomorrow? But presumably new plans will be on offer?

 

Must look into that speed cap thing (thought you had to get a mobile phone to get good data and speed). Perhaps its only the unlimited offering.

 

Regards

 

Peter Gillespie

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

10000000000GB

Optus periodically flog the 100GB mobile broadband up to 200GB. Their first round in March-May was $70 with Netflix. Prior to that, they had a 140GB 12month contract, which got disappeared. OVO is flogging 250GB, but it's a bit expensive. But you can get 100GB from Optus and resellers at any time.

 

The current buzz is a $199 unlimited plan on Telstra which terms state has to be used in a phone, but people are using in modems up to large GBs.

 

The market is moving into large plan territory.

 

 

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

petergdownload

Interesting products. Smart too. Telstra are essentially selling ~100Gb-200Gb plans for $200. As long as Telstra can moderate the data pulled through to all users (possibly these SIMs get data as a second priority to 'normal' phone customers)

 

I also especially like the $10 peace of mind option. A win win IMO as Telstra get $10 from many customers who hardly ever go over their limit (but still want the peace of mind) while customers get, well they get peace of mind.

 

Hopefully we will see Optus move to a similar scheme sooner rather than later. In this day and age of 100Gb plans charging excess data rates at 1000% markup and providing little ability to put the breaks on streaming Gbs in minutes is pretty unconscionable conduct IMO)

 

Peter Gillespie

Highlighted

Re: Connected to Distant Exchange

10000000000GB

>>Telstra are essentially selling ~100Gb-200Gb plans for $200. 

 

I'm not sure what they are selling. One guy on Whirl pulled down 500. Likely they will kick him off next month.

 

I was trying to find out what 4G was. They call it LTE, but LTE is just a target and a view that they will evolve it for a while. The actual system they use is just a bunch of letters I never heard of before, like LMOALGBTIQ.

 

But according to one tech website I read, each 5Mhz down allows 200 full speed connections. Of course, Optus uses 10-15 most of the time and Telstra uses 20. The latency in 4G is lowered by MIMO, which means the packet is cut up and sent via a few channels, so shorten the transmit time.

 

I'm not sure how they handle people with poor reception. Given the amount of bandwidth they seem to have, there is room for a fair bit of action. I don't even know how my local tower shows any contention... it must be due to backhaul. Telstra certainly arent willing to put any backhaul on the same tower.

 

 

 

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